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2016 Cockie Report Now Out - New report reveals black future for endangered cockatoos. 

The numbers are in and the news for Perth’s much-loved black-cockatoos is far from encouraging. Results from BirdLife Australia’s 2016 Great Cocky Count indicate that populations of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos across the Perth–Peel Coastal Plain are still in rapid decline. 

In one of the largest citizen science surveys of its kind in Australia, this year more than 700 volunteers took part in the Great Cocky Count across the Perth–Peel Coastal Plain. Their task: to count black-cockatoos as they flew in to roost sites in the evening. 

What they saw really set alarm bells ringing,” said Adam Peck, who coordinated the Great Cocky Count. “This year’s results backed up the shocking rate of decline we’ve detected in previous years’ counts. The numbers continue to fall.” 

When you crunch the numbers, with 10,919 Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos counted, the population in the Perth–Peel Coastal Plain has halved in the last six years, falling by an average of 10% per year. 

At that rate, the people of Perth are likely to lose their Carnaby’s population in just a few years.

Read full report here.

 

2015 Cockie Count. 

Birdlife Australia released the results of the 2015 Great Cocky Count with the alarming news that Carnaby’s continue to decline in the Perth region. They indicated that trend analysis of roost counts in the Perth‐Peel Coastal Plain found significant declines in both the fraction of occupied roosts and flock size over the last six years (2010‐2015).

The combined effect of fewer occupied roosts and fewer birds in each roosting flock is an estimated current rate of decline of 15% per year in the total number of Carnaby’s Black‐Cockatoos on the Perth‐Peel Coastal Plain.

This year, the minimum number of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos recorded in the Greater Perth–Peel Region was 5518 birds, continuing the drop in numbers from previous years’ counts.

Analyses of numbers from seven Great Cocky Counts have shown a significant, ongoing decline in their population, a reduction in flock size as well as fewer occupied roost sites around Perth.

Read the full report here.  

Read the Birdlife WA report synopsis here. 

Carnaby’s Cockatoos facing extinction. 

 

2012 - 2013 News

 

2013: EPBC Referral Guidelines for Endangered Black Cockatoos released.

 

Birdlife Australia reports on the 2013 Cockie Count - Cockie numbers continue to to be way down on historical levels.

From: Matt Fossey | Threatened Cockatoos Project Manager | Birdlife Australia.

Dear 2013 Great Cocky Count volunteers, 

It’s taken us longer than expected but the results of this year’s Great Cocky Count were released this week! There has been some media interest in the key findings so you may have already read an article about it in your local paper or online. The full report and summary is currently available from: http://birdlife.org.au/media/future-looks-black-for-carnabys-cockatoos/
 
The 2013 count of 5800 cockies in the Swan Region was a 44% increase from 2012 but numbers are still down by 14% on the 6700 birds recorded in 2010. The increased numbers observed in 2013 were focused in the Northern suburbs and Northern Swan Coastal Plain areas.The greater numbers of Carnaby’s counted north of the Swan River is potentially due to parts of the Gnangara, Pinjar and Yanchep pine plantations being cleared, removing critical feeding and roosting habitat, and causing the cockatoos to move to coastal locations where they are more easily observed.
 
The 2013 results also show a change in how the cockies are utilising some of the best-monitored metropolitan roosts, which highlights the need to monitor as many sites as possible in order to pick up movements between roosts and to better assess the Swan Region population as a whole.
 
While the Great Cocky Count’s value remains strongest in and around Perth (now with 4 years of consecutive data), confirmed roosts in regional areas will, in time, provide information on Carnaby’s population changes beyond the Swan Region.  
 
I’m pleased to advise that Perth Region NRM will be funding the next Great Cocky Count, which will take place on Sunday 6 April 2014. Please mark the date on your calendars! BirdLife Australia is currently recruiting for the 2014 Great Cocky Count Coordinator and we hope to welcome a new coordinator on board in January. In the meantime, you can report new roost sites and send roost count reports to: greatcockycount@birdlife.org.au, although this address is not being regularly checked.

 

Geoff Barrett's talk to UBC now available

1-barrett captureIn August, Dr Geoff Barrett from DEC provided an update on the status of black cockatoos in the southwest of WA to a large group of UBC members and supporters.  His talk focussed on changes to both behaviour and numbers, particularly since the first Great Cocky Count by BirdLife Australia in 2006.

Download his presentation here

 

 

Birdlife Australia reports on the 2012 count - Cockie numbers continue to crash.

Great Cocky Count 2011 Report Released - Numbers Crash!   Read the Summary Report here...

Env. Min. Bill Marmion Responds; barely acknowledges the scale of the problem...

 Comment: 

Released at last.  Minister Marmion's media statement is completely inadequate.  4000ha is nothing in the context of what is being lost and revegetated land will not provide any habitat for 20 years! Minister Marmion can protect remaining habitat by saying 'no' to clearing of Banksia Woodland habitat under the EP Act and it will not cost anything.

Also  there is an urgent need to make all habitat for endangered Black Cockatoos  protected in law - either by an urgent amendment to the Wildlife Conservation Act or by introduction of a new regulation under the EP Act declaring all habitat of endangered species 'protected'. 

Read the Report...

Sally Talbot Responds...

ABC Video Report on Likely Extinction.

Sally Talbot launches Cockie educational materials. Find them here.

Older News

dsc_0030Draft Federal Guidelines

The Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities has released draft referral guidelines for three species of Western Australian black cockatoos.

The draft referral guidelines can be found on the Department’s website at www.environment.gov.au/epbc/publications/wa-black-cockatoos.html.

The guidelines closed for public comment 20th of August.

These guidelines will apply to Carnaby’s cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris), Baudin’s cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus baudinii) and the forest red-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii naso), anywhere they may occur in Western Australia.

These species are listed as threatened under national environment legislation the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999  (EPBC Act) as follows:
•         Carnaby’s cockatoo: endangered
•         Baudin’s cockatoo: vulnerable
•         Forest red-tailed black cockatoo: vulnerable

New State Government Environmental Offsets Policy

"The Western Australian Government’s Environmental Offsets Policy seeks to protect and conserve environmental and biodiversity values for present and future generations. This policy ensures that economic and social development may occur while supporting long term environmental and conservation values.
The use of environmental offsets will not replace proper on-site environmental practices, such as avoidance and mitigation. Offsets will be used to compensate for residual environmental impacts and be designed to achieve long-term outcomes, building upon existing conservation programs and initiatives....." Download here.

 

dsc_0059Roe 8 Highway Extension Public Environmental Review

From: Help Save Beeliar Wetlands! http://savebeeliarwetlands.com/  (Note - this link is not operational - please copy and paste into your url bar).

The State Government is currently taking public submissions as part of the Public Environmental Review (PER) process for the proposed Roe 8 Highway Extension. This road would cut through the heart of the Beeliar wetlands and destroy 78 hectares of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo habitat. Hon Lynn MacLaren MLC is actively opposing the construction of the proposed Roe 8 Highway extension and has produced some factsheets detailing her concerns which can be downloaded from her website. These are intended to help members of the community to make submissions to the PER. Lynn would be most grateful if you could help distribute these through your networks. More copies of the factsheets can be obtained from our office.

Lynn is urging concerned community members to consider making a submission to the PER; this can be as simple as writing a letter expressing your view about the project. Or you can use the form on the Conservation Council website. This is an important opportunity for you to influence Government decisions. Without your help, this peaceful place may be changed forever at great cost and for little benefit. The public submission period for the PER closes on 12th September.

Media Release - No Christmas Dinner for Black Cockatoos?

The Destruction Continues

Monash Bushland in Monash Avenue, Nedlands, on the QE11 site.